Seasonal vegetables asian-A Farmers Market Guide to Asian Vegetables | CUESA

Vegetables are healthy and great, but they are boring and hard to cook. Chinese love leafy greens: choy sum , kai lan , bok choy , gai choy , etc. In everyday Chinese meal, there is always a vegetable dish to complement other main dishes. Choy sum is great with oyster sauce, but an occasional white sauce is awesome, too. In Chinese or Cantonese restaurants, Chinese vegetables choy sum are often served two ways: brown sauce or white sauce--a recipe I am sharing with you today.

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian

Add mushrooms and shrimp and do a few quick stir until the shrimps become half-cooked. This site uses Akismet to Seasonal vegetables asian spam. I made it tonight on a whim, served with brown rice and minus the beef. Seasonal vegetables asian cook until it just starts to get tender, 1 minute or so. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Free videos webcam sex adult. Asian Vegetable Stir Fry

Make sure that you are eating sweet potato vsgetables and NOT potato leaves in the nightshade family that contain solanine, which is toxic to humans. It is lovely as tempura, as served at Nihonbashi Tenmatsu. Seasonal vegetables asian large oblong or round melon requiring Seasonal vegetables asian long, very warm growing season of about days. Grow sesame for seed to be used as a snack, as vegetablss garnish, add to Vt gay outdoor sports organization dishes or press into crust of pies. Grow in soil immersed about three inches below water level. Piper nigrum originated in the Malabar region of southwestern India and today is grown mainly in India, Sarawak, Indonesia, and Brazil. Strawberries are all over the markets vegetxbles, and perhaps best experienced in sweets found at depachika. Mature melons can be cooked unpeeled, but their seeds and pith should be removed. If you're a fan of any of them, get these foods while you can! This plant is not frost tender; sow in garden Seasonal vegetables asian couple of weeks before the last frost—start early.

Asian vegetables and produce belong in every home cook's repertoire.

  • Fruits and vegetables are at their best when they're grown and harvested in their natural seasons and don't travel too far before being gobbled up.
  • Asian vegetables and produce belong in every home cook's repertoire.
  • And, as always let us know if you have any questions or request in the comments!
  • Chinese vegetables, sometimes called Oriental vegetables, favored in Chinese and Asian cooking are easy to grow.

Asian vegetables and produce belong in every home cook's repertoire. Because of the term's vast geographic mass, some ingredients are used across many regions, while others are specific to one or a few regions.

For instance, lemongrass, predominant in Southeast Asian cooking, isn't used in East Asian cuisines, but ginger is used throughout the continent. Alternate Names: Nam tao, bottle gourd, cucuzza squash, calabash, yugao, long squash, bau, Italian edible gourd, New Guinea bean, Tasmania bean, snake gourd, po gua, kwa kwa, upo, dudi.

Characteristics: This long, smooth-skinned gourd has a mild taste somewhat reminiscent of zucchini. Wait too long, and it will dry out and become hollow. This squash may have originated in Africa but it is used in European and Southeast Asian cooking in traditional dishes such as the Vietnamese soup canh bau tom and the Italian cunigghiu salted cod fish , which relies on dried cucuzza.

If you can't find opo squash, use zucchini. Alternate Names: Cocoyam, arrow root, kalo, dasheen, sato imo, gabi, patra, woo tau. Characteristics: Native to Malaysia, this rough-textured, hairy brown tuber is used in cuisines as varied as Polynesian and Indian.

A close relative, the yautia, is found in African and Caribbean cuisines and is treated like a potato. In Hawaii, taro is used to make traditional poi, a gelatinous dish made from steaming and pounding the root into a pulp. In Indian cooking, slices of taro root are seasoned with spices and then fried. And although taro is consumed throughout the year in Chinese cuisine you can find taro cakes at dim sum , it is especially popular during the Lunar New Year's celebrations, when you can find taro-filled moon cakes.

Characteristics: Looking at the beautiful lotus flower floating on the water, you might be surprised to find out that the "roots" technically the flower's stem are also edible. The lotus root looks like a chain of giant pods connected to one another. Although used throughout Asia, the lotus root is closely associated with Chinese cuisine.

It is also prized for its unique interior pattern of holes, which add a decorative aspect to a dish. Characteristics: This large radish resembles an overgrown carrot that lost its orange coloring. As with any radish—Asian or European—it should be free of blemishes and not soft and pliable. In Korea, cubed daikon radish is used to make a type of kimchi.

Its mild taste makes it an excellent palate cleanser. In Japan, strings of daikon marinated in vinegar typically accompany sashimi. Try serving the radish in light salads where its own flavor won't be overwhelmed by the other ingredients.

When choosing an eggplant at the market, look for one that is firm and yet, when slightly squeezed, should also have a slight give to it. Traditional culinary uses in Asia include grilling, stir-frying, and stuffing.

Characteristics: This hardy plant looks like a cross between celery and a scallion but tastes like neither. Rather, this herb, native to Southeast Asia, imparts a lemony, citrus flavor to dishes.

Woody and thick, lemongrass is not easily digestible, making it ideal for flavoring foods. Look for stalks that are pale at the root ends and green toward the tops. To release the aromatic oils, bruise the stalks and then remove them before serving. Tom Yum, the quintessential Thai soup, highlights the bright flavor of lemongrass. For an easy way to enjoy lemongrass, make some tea. Alternate Names: Chinese cabbage, celery cabbage, baechu, Peking cabbage, hakusai, michihli.

Because it has a less bitter taste than some varieties, the Napa cabbage easily adopts strongly flavored marinades and sauces.

The leaves, which are densely packed, should be a grassy-green hue and have a bright white stalk center, with no brown spots or blemishes. In East Asia, the cabbage's leaves are used in soups and stir-fries; it is also a main ingredient in Korean's unofficial national dish, kimchi.

Characteristics: Though this cabbage looks very much like baby bok choy with its gently curving bottom and rounded leaves, its yellow flowers are what set it apart. By comparison, Chinese broccoli [gai lan] has white flowers and serrated leaves. Alternate Names: Balsam pear, bitter gourd, bitter cucumber, ampalaya, foo gwa, karela.

If eaten in an unripe state, it lives up to its name. Allow it to ripen, though, and the interior gains a lovely reddish hue and it has a sweeter flavor.

Grown in tropical regions throughout the world, the melon's bitterness due to small amounts of quinine is an acquired taste. If you cook it, treat it as you would a zucchini, and then try making pinakbet , a traditional Filipino dish that includes vegetables such bitter melon, eggplant, tomatoes, okra, and string beans.

Characteristics: Originating in China, kumquats are the smallest citrus fruits in the world. Grape-sized, they pack an intense flavor that is both sweet and sour, with a surprising twist in that the skin is sweeter than the pulp. The fruit is consumed in its entirety, skin and all, but can also be preserved, candied, or pickled. Because of their size, kumquats are typically eaten and served whole, and make for a lovely visual asset. They're a popular treat during the Chinese New Year, symbolizing prosperity and unity.

Serve kumquats in a salad or use them to flavor savory foods like meat and poultry, as well as in cocktails. Try substituting kumquats for lime. Alternate Names: Galanga root, galingale, Thai ginger, blue ginger, laos ginger, Siamese ginger. Characteristics: Galangal's shape is similar to that of ginger, but it has a distinct ringed red-orange-brown-colored skin that feels waxy. Its interior is white but turns brown when exposed to the air.

Cook it as you would ginger—minced, sliced, grated, ground up—and use as flavoring. Galangal is used throughout Southeast Asia in such dishes as Indonesian fried rice nasi goreng , Malaysian rendang a currylike meat or poultry dish , and Thai curries.

Alternate Names: Cocoyam, arrow root, kalo, dasheen, sato imo, gabi, patra, woo tau Characteristics: Native to Malaysia, this rough-textured, hairy brown tuber is used in cuisines as varied as Polynesian and Indian. Tempura Shrimp and Vegetables.

Alternate Names: Asian or Oriental radish, mooli, moo, lo bok, white radish Characteristics: This large radish resembles an overgrown carrot that lost its orange coloring. Pan-Seared Eggplant with Buttermilk Dressing. Vermicelli Noodles with Lemongrass Pork Meatballs. Spicy Kimchi Slaw. Characteristics: Alternate Name: Bok choy sum, yu choy sum, flowering Chinese cabbage Characteristics: Though this cabbage looks very much like baby bok choy with its gently curving bottom and rounded leaves, its yellow flowers are what set it apart.

Bitter Melon. Alternate Name: Cumquats Characteristics: Originating in China, kumquats are the smallest citrus fruits in the world.

Three soaks in cool water should do it. Rather, this herb, native to Southeast Asia, imparts a lemony, citrus flavor to dishes. Yard-long bean Vigna unguiculata ssp. The tubers of arrowhead are eaten; bitter when raw but full-flavored like a nutty sweet potato when cooked. Fruits and vegetables are at their best when they're grown and harvested in their natural seasons and don't travel too far before being gobbled up. Characteristics: Though this cabbage looks very much like baby bok choy with its gently curving bottom and rounded leaves, its yellow flowers are what set it apart.

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian. Cultivating a Healthy Food System

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This Chinese mixed vegetable stir-fry combines the classic Chinese flavours with fresh, crunchy vegetables. It is the perfect side dish for any oriental meal, but can also be a standalone vegan dish. I recently served this as a side for Mongolian lamb , and it was amazing.

The beauty of this recipe is its versatility. Use any of your favourite vegetables. In order to make a good stir fry there are two different methods which you can use.

The first method is to put the vegetable in raw, starting with the ones that take the longest to cook. Proceed to cook at medium heat while stirring constantly. This is where the name stir-fry comes from. The other way to do it is to parboil the vegetables, drain them and finishing them off at high heat in the wok. Which method you use is completely up to you. I have tried both and I must say I am having a hard time telling which is best. If anything, the sauce seems to stick a bit better using the slow method, and it saves me the trouble of parboiling the vegetables first.

For my Chinese mixed vegetable stir fry I used broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, baby sweetcorn, sugar snap peas and asparagus. I find the combination of sweet and bitter tasting vegetables ideal for a Chinese stir fry. Nonetheless you can make a number of variations to the vegetable mix. Bell peppers are always good in a stir fry but have you thought about using kale or bok choy? If you are keen to emphasise the Chinese element in the Chinese mixed vegetable stir fry, you can add water chestnuts or bamboo shoots.

Not only do they taste great, they also add a crispy element to the stir fry. Another variation you can try is to replace the ordinary white mushrooms with Asian sorts such as shiitake. If you are a crunchy type of person, nuts are a welcome addition to the Chinese mixed vegetable stir fry too — especially cashews or peanuts.

Another tip is to add bean sprouts at the end of cook time. These taste best if they a still fresh and not fully cooked through. If you feel like you are missing protein in the dish you can solve it by adding tofu. Substituting vegetables is not the only way you can tweak the Chinese mixed vegetable stir fry.

You can also do a great deal to the flavour using Chinese sauces. For example, you can use fish sauce or oyster sauce, which have intense fragrant, salty flavours that add enormous depth to the stir fry. Another alternative would be hoisin sauce, which is a thick fragrant Chinese sauce based on soy. These days you can easily find it in supermarkets but if all else fails you can go to a Chinese store to pick up a bottle or two….

Add sweet chili sauce, Chinese chili oil or even chopped, fresh chillies. Or try sambal oelek , a type of chilli paste from Indonesia. Also, consider making a stir fry with oyster sauce. Just take a look at my chicken in oyster sauce stir fry recipe or this shrimp in oyster sauce. Meat eaters can add their preferred type of meat into the pan with the vegetables. Lean meats are perfect for this purpose, especially chicken and turkey, but beef or pork work as well.

In order to get the best result you have to slice the meat very thinly, so that it takes only a short time to cook. Alternatively, you can serve the stir fry with boiled or fried noodles.

As mentioned earlier, the Chinese mixed vegetable stir fry is also an excellent side for any meat or fish cooked in an oriental way.

You can adjust the vegetables, seasoning and accompaniments to your preference. As always, I like to finish the dish off with a little bit of green on the top. In order to keep in line with the Chinese theme, I recommend using herbs such as coriander.

The subtle onion taste complements the sweet and umami flavours of the stir fry very well. Or this pickled daikon recipe. Toasted sesame seeds are a bonus! Subscribe to our newsletter to not miss out.

Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Search this website. What is your favourite Chinese side dish?

Print Print Recipe. Pin Recipe. Scale 1x 2x 3x Ingredients 30 ml 2 tbsp oil 1 head broccoli, cut into florets 4 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 5 cm 2in ginger, peeled and grated 2 carrots, peeled and sliced 90 g 3 oz mushrooms, washed and chopped 90 g 3 oz baby sweetcorn, washed and trimmed 90 g 3 oz mangetout or sugar snap peas, washed and trimmed 90 g 3 oz asparagus, washed and cut into bite size pieces 30 ml 2 tbsp soy sauce 5 ml 1 tsp cornflour Salt and pepper, to taste.

Instructions Heat the 15ml 1 tbsp oil in a large wok and fry the broccoli for 1 minute. Add a splash of water and cover with a lid to cook for 3 minutes. Add the remainder of the oil to the wok and fry the garlic and ginger with broccoli for 1 minute.

Tip in the rest of the vegetables and fry for about 5 minutes or cooked until desired consistency. Prepare a slurry in a cup by combining the soy sauce and cornflour then drizzle over the vegetables and stir to coat evenly. Season to taste, and serve immediate with steamed white rice or as a side dish to a Chinese meal. Notes Substitute the vegetables with your favourites, such as peppers, kale, bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. This recipe is very basic and you can tweak it to your preference such as adding honey, hoisin, oyster or sweet chilli sauce to it.

Cashew nuts are a great addition to this dish. Alternatively, you can parboil the veggies first before finishing them off in the wok. Nutrition Serving Size: 1 serving Calories: 82 Sugar: 2. First Name Email Address. Comments I like prawn dumplings. I like Chinese fried cabbage. It is really light. Lovely with soya sauce. Love stir fry and now I can make it at home! Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Seasonal vegetables asian

Seasonal vegetables asian