Bmi and breast cancer-Higher body fat linked to lower breast cancer risk in younger women -- ScienceDaily

Linear and nonlinear trend analyses were conducted to explore the dose—response relationship between BMI and breast cancer risk. Notably, further subgroup meta-analysis found that higher BMI could be a protective factor of breast cancer risk for premenopausal women SRR: 0. However, higher BMI could be a protective factor in breast cancer risk for premenopausal women. Further studies are necessary to verify these findings and elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms. For both overweight and obese people, excess body weight is generally recognized as a significant risk factor for many common cancers.

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer

Mammographic breast density and breast cancer risk: interactions of percent density, absolute dense, and non-dense areas with breast cancer risk factors. Schoemaker, PhD; Hazel B. Article Google Scholar 5. Our website uses cookies to enhance your experience. We do not store details you enter into this form. Breast Cancer.

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There was a 4. Statistical analysis In our study, the associations between different BMI groups and clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer patients were analyzed by the chi-square test. Pooled analysis yielded a Bmi and breast cancer risk ratio of 0. Ahn, Cancer Causes Control ; 19 — The team wanted to understand breadt BMI at different ages affected risk. The way doctors' offices work, the doctors don't see us on our feet. While doctors often consider an obese patient's cancer risk, they may not automatically think about the risk of malignancy when Execution of homosexuals individual has a normal BMI, said study lead author Dr. Nurses' Health Study [6]. In multivariate analysis, the normal weight group was regarded as a reference for calculating the HR of BMI. View Infographic. This site uses cookies to assist with cwncer, analyse your use of our services, and provide content from third parties. Breast cancer and hormone replacement therapy: collaborative reanalysis of data from 51 epidemiological studies of 52, women with breast cancer andwomen without breast cancer.

Research has shown that overweight and obese women -- defined as having a BMI body mass index higher than 25 -- have a higher risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer compared to women who maintain a healthy weight, especially after menopause.

  • Body mass index BMI is calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared.
  • To measure obesity, researchers commonly use a scale known as the body mass index BMI.
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Research has shown that overweight and obese women -- defined as having a BMI body mass index higher than 25 -- have a higher risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer compared to women who maintain a healthy weight, especially after menopause.

Scientists also have found that extra fat cells can trigger long-term, low-grade inflammation in the body. Chronic inflammation has been linked to a higher risk of breast cancer recurrence; the proteins secreted by the immune system seem to stimulate breast cancer cells to grow, especially estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. An observational study seems to suggest that premenopausal women with a higher BMI body mass index may have a lower risk of breast cancer.

To do the study, the researchers looked at information on , premenopausal women from 19 studies: 9 in North America, 7 in Europe, 2 in Asia, and 1 in Australia. The women joined the studies between and and each was followed for about 5 to 14 years. The researchers analyzed the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer with BMI measurements at four5 age periods:.

In the studies, the women often self-reported their height and weight, and in some cases, the women measured their own height and weight. This association was particularly strong in women ages 18 to Because the association with BMI at ages 18 to 24 is significant for ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, hormonal and non-hormonal mechanisms might be involved.

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Support for Caregivers. If you do not agree to such placement, do not provide the information. Questions to Ask about Your Treatment. Committees of Interest. Ladoire et al. Sgroi DC, et al. We used the Cochran Q test and the I 2 statistic to examine heterogeneity among the studies

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer. Use predictive power to personalize her path

We have a unique set of hurdles to deal with. Jul 29, PM illimae wrote:. Jul 30, AM AliceBastable wrote:. Sports medicine doctors suck and only want perfect patients. One of my hubby's co-workers had bilateral knee replacement and she was well over pounds. Jul 30, AM Mavericksmom wrote:. I agree Alice, sports medicine doctors really specialize in that because they want to work on athletes. In a weird way, I understand that, but when there are limited options for orthopedic medicine in an area, they should either treat the non-athlete with all the respect they give all their patients or refer to someone who can help that person without judgement.

I had a knee issue once, and kind of feel it happening again. My doctor wasn't judgmental, he did explain how many pounds of pressure would be taken off my knees per pound of weight loss. He motivated me, he didn't shame me. I very much appreciated that because shaming makes me mad and has the opposite response, I feel defeated and I eat for comfort! I know I am up against the odds now, that going back to the gym will not be fun or instantly rewarding. Perhaps I am setting my expectations low, but my number one goal is to make exercise a habit.

I plan to begin with 30 minutes of exercise but that doesn't mean it will be all at once. I know that you need something like minutes before your body actually starts to receive any benefit. I want to ask my cardiologist today about how much I should do. I am a science person who loves math. The Max-heart rate formula that they use for stress tests has always been an example of bad medical math.

A person's number for age has NO correlation of the person's exercise ability. The is a shady figure too, but not nearly as shady as the "age" number.

Yes age has impact on our life and our exercise, but who hasn't know people who are young and act very old and older people who act very young? Age is a factor in that there are biological factors that change with age, but NEVER at a precise time, ie: age women go through natural menopause.

I have had an issue with this formula since I was in my 40's! Anyway, none of us wishes to be heavy and we are all in a constant battle trying to get healthy. There should never be comments about our weight.

Comments are the reason I will never have a breast MRI. I tried years ago. The machine was in a "trailer" hospital addition. The techs were very young, didn't seem to know what they were doing.

I was way below the max weight of the machine. They told me to lay down on the table, never told me to open the gown and let my breasts go in the holes, no help whatsoever! Next thing I know they told me to get off because "my hips were too big to fit into the machine.

All medical students, doctors, technicians, etc, should have training to understand that their words matter and if they truly want to help people, they need to be encouraging and not judgmental! Jul 30, AM santabarbarian wrote:. Here is a minimal but effective exercise routine suggested by an integrative oncologist when I had a consult w him for use during chemo to maintain fitness This is a minimal yet heart-effective daily exercise plan.

Jul 30, PM AliceBastable wrote:. My current problem is my arthritis acting up to the point that exercise-type walking is difficult. I walked a lot last year during all the cancer crap and looked and felt great.

Now my "good" hip is giving me fits, and since it makes me walk crooked, it throws my back out of kilter and sets off problems there. It's weird, the Dexa scan showed osteoporosis in this hip, but the other bone scan from last year didn't show any arthritis there about the only place without it! I thought osteoporosis didn't hurt until something broke. And it hurts worst when I'm laying down, some nights I barely sleep because I can't find a position.

Standing is fine, sitting is sort of okay, and I can walk but not as fast as I'd like and kind of crooked. Very different from when my other hip had arthritis before I got a new joint.

Very frustrating. I have to get a new PCP which means no appointment until September, because I can only change at the beginning of a month in my insurance plan. I have to wait until a prescription renewal clears this week at my old doctor's before officially switching, which puts me into a new month.

Jul 30, PM movingsoccermom wrote:. An appropriate whine fest AliceBastable!!! Is there anywhere you could swim? Way back in my 20's I competed in triathlons and found swimming to be the least offensive for joints noticed it even then. If the water is chilly you could look for neoprene to keep you warm while swimming.

Additionally, I used to swim with a float between my knees to use only my arms--if your legs are too painful, that might be an option to still swim and nurse your sore joints. Not sure swimming ever helped me lose weight, but it sure did help my overall fitness.

I am commiserating on the joints--my left hip and knee are chronic problems. I never learned how to swim. I think the closest Y is several miles from here, and I don't drive. TWO things I should have learned when I was younger. And now my shoulders are a mess from arthritis, too, so I'm not sure swimming would be doable in any case. It's stupid, but I panic in water above my knees. Geez, people like me annoy the heck out of me.

The onc gyn kept saying "Go out and take a brisk walk! The way doctors' offices work, the doctors don't see us on our feet. We're in a chair or on the examining thingy by the time we see the doc, and we could be paralyzed from the waist down for all they know.

Add in a completely clueless PCP, who doesn't open emails from other doctors until months later why I'm looking for a new one , and I'm just frustrated and cranky. Aug 11, PM movingsoccermom wrote:. My Mom never learned to swim either, so I totally understand your terror--I have seen it on my Mom's face. It is so frustrating the way our system works, that you have to wait so long for a new doctor. I hope you are able to find a good one.

And yes. Hyper specialization has gotten worse over the years. So has the way doctors DON'T listen to patients--which then exacerbates everything. Have you considered trying medical marijuana? I have used CBD gummies to help with sleep and pain management and found it very effective my 23 year old DS helps me find it.

Aug 12, AM Mavericksmom wrote:. Aug 27, AM Fairydragonfly wrote:. I have a BMI of I'm well aware of the health issues it causes. It's something I have struggled with for decades. So once chemo is done for my breast cancer, I move on to prophylactic surgeries breasts, hysterectomy. While this does mean I can have immediate reconstruction, the plastic surgeon basically said I am too fat for anything to work or look good.

I'm devastated. I'm overwhelmed. And I'm questioning if all this is even worth it when there is NO guarantee that the cancer won't come back. I was trying to minimize the amount of surgeries I would have to do. Now I'm looking at at least 4 and a very long road ahead if I do gastric bypass, which I don't want to do.

My mood plummeted so low yesterday I called a crisis support line. Why am I going through all this? Aug 27, AM DorothyB wrote:. Throwing another option out there which may or may not work - can you have largest possible implant on that side and have breast reduction on the other side so that they will be closer to the same size?

Aug 27, AM illimae wrote:. Two surgeons, one OR, one recovery. Could that be an option for you? Aug 27, AM mistyeyes wrote:. I have been reading all the posts. I am overweight and am struggling with food and exercising. My husband died last Sept. I am hoping that I will get some motivation from reading here Aug 27, AM santabarbarian wrote:. Might be something to try. It's a prophylactic double mastectomy, so both breasts will be symmetrical size wise with an implant - the problem is they will be smaller width wise.

They will be fuller closer to the middle of my chest and she's not sure what the sides will look like. I'm just in a very bad head space right now. I want to lose weight, but it's always been a struggle. Now trying to lose weight while dealing with cancer and unresolved grief from the loss of my parents It feels impossible. Then I start going down the mortality hole.

I have difficulty seeing myself alive past Aug 27, PM santabarbarian wrote:. FD are you comfortable with waiting for implants? Do MX but take step at a time, so to speak?

Toggle navigation. Order BCI. References Sgroi DC, et al. J Natl Cancer Inst. Sgroi DC, et al. Lancet Oncol. Zhang Y, et al. Clin Cancer Res. Sanft T, et al.

Body mass index and prognosis of breast cancer

We performed a retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated in our hospital from January to December The clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients within 5 years following breast cancer diagnosed were analyzed. Subgroup analyses of BMI on breast cancer prognosis were analyzed according to the menopausal status when breast cancer diagnosis.

Among premenopausal patients, the risks of relapse and death were significantly increased in obesity group rather than overweight group by multivariate analysis.

Overweight and obesity might be independently associated with poorer prognosis for breast cancer patients, and the effects of overweight on the breast cancer prognosis seem to be related to menopausal status.

Nowadays, obesity or overweight has become an emerging health concern worldwide with over million adults were obese and million were overweight in , [ 1 , 2 ] and overweight or obesity was also reported to be a risk factor for increased incidence of various forms of cancer. In , Berclaz et al [ 9 ] have reported that obesity or overweight is associated with a poor prognosis after breast cancer treatment, and other studies also suggested that obesity at the time of cancer diagnosis or pre-diagnosis is associated with poor prognosis for breast cancer patients.

According to previous study, the effects of higher BMI on prognosis of breast cancer may be associated with menopausal status. In a cohort study, obese postmenopausal women at diagnosis were at increased risk of breast cancer mortality compared to normal weight women after 6-year follow-up, while being overweight did not affect survival.

In our study, we presented the analysis of the link between BMI and prognosis of breast cancer, and the stratification analysis was also conducted according to menopausal status when breast cancer diagnosis. Data in the study were extracted from the hospital recording statistics in the Affiliated Changzhou No. We collected primary and adjuvant treatment from medical records: surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and specific hormonal therapy.

Survival data, which included date of breast cancer diagnosis, surgery, relapse, death and last follow-up, were collected in this cohort. The diagnostic of breast cancer was based on the pathological diagnosis. Patients who did not perform surgery were excluded.

We further excluded patients who were without complete medical records, dying from other causes within 5 years of breast cancer diagnosis and lost follow-up.

A total of breast cancer patients were treated with surgery in our hospital. The final analytic cohort consisted of women. All study participants provided written informed consent and the study protocol and procedures were approved by the institutional review boards at the Affiliated Changzhou No.

We calculated BMI as weight in kilograms divided by height in square meters. Patient's weight and height were recorded before surgery. Three groups were divided according to BMI when breast cancer diagnosis: normal weight group , overweight group , and obesity group Menopausal status was defined by 1 year of amenorrhea, or previous bilateral oophorectomy. In the present study, a total of breast cancer patients were postmenopausal, and breast cancer patients were premenopausal.

The differences in clinicopathologic characteristics and 5-year breast cancer outcomes between 3 groups were compared. Events used for the analysis were 5-year mortality of breast cancer or relapse including local, regional and contralateral breast cancer or distant breast cancer recurrence.

DFS defined as the time of diagnosis to development of first evidence of recurrence distant metastasis or local regional recurrence or date of last follow-up. OS was defined as from the time of diagnosis to last follow-up or time of mortality from breast cancer patients dying from other causes within 5 years of breast cancer diagnosis were excluded. In our study, the associations between different BMI groups and clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer patients were analyzed by the chi-square test.

Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios HRs of different BMI groups. In multivariate analysis, the normal weight group was regarded as a reference for calculating the HR of BMI.

Stratified analyses were conducted to explore whether the effects of obesity or overweight on prognosis of breast cancer were modified by menopausal status. All statistical analyses were carried out with SPSS software version The median follow-up time for this study was 80 months 13— months.

Of the breast cancer patients, were normal weight, patients were overweight, and were obesity. In total, patients suffered from breast cancer relapse within 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis, and the number of recurrent patients was 60, 71, and 49 in the normal weight group, overweight group, and obesity group, respectively. The 5-year DFS and breast cancer relapse rate for the whole cohort were A total of patients died of breast cancer, 34 patients were in the normal weight group, 46 cases were in the overweight group, and 35 cases were in the obesity group.

The 5-year OS and breast cancer mortality rate were The DFS was The OS was The 5-year DFS in the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups were The 5-year OS in the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups were Kaplan—Meier analysis of 5-year survival outcomes for breast cancer patients according to BMI.

A, Disease-free survival. B, Overall survival. Statistically significant differences between the groups were estimated by log-rank test. In multivariate analysis, when compared with normal weight patients, the risks of 5-year breast cancer relapse HR, 1. In univariate analysis, both the 5-year DFS and OS were significantly different among the 3 groups for premenopausal patients.

By multivariate analysis, the 5-year risks of breast cancer relapse HR, 1. However, the 5-year risks of relapse HR, 1. Kaplan—Meier analysis of 5-year survival outcomes for premenopausal breast cancer patients according to BMI. When compared to the normal weight group, the 5-year DFS and OS of overweight and obesity groups for postmenopausal patients were significantly decreased.

By multivariate analysis, 5-year risks of relapse HR, 1. The 5-year risks of breast cancer relapse HR, 2. Kaplan—Meier analysis of 5-year survival outcomes for postmenopausal breast cancer patients according to BMI. Obesity and overweight in adults have been reported to be correlated with a greater risk of breast cancer, [ 6 , 19 ] while the studies that evaluated influence of overweight and obesity on breast cancer survival have yielded mixed findings.

In our study, we found that overweight and obese breast cancer patients were associated with larger size tumors compared to normal weight patients. We also found that overweight and obesity were independent predictors for increased risks of 5-year breast cancer relapse and mortality for the whole cohort.

In a previous study from America, after 5-year follow-up, the authors calculated that HRs for risks of recurrence was 1. In stratified analysis, we found that being overweight was associated with increased risks of breast cancer relapse and mortality within 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis for postmenopausal but not for premenopausal women, and obesity was an independently poor predictor for breast cancer relapse and mortality regardless to menopausal status.

Similar to our study, Reeves et al [ 4 ] have reported that obesity and overweight were related to increased breast cancer progression and mortality primarily in British postmenopausal women. A meta-analysis of 82 studies that included , breast cancer patients demonstrated that obesity was associated with higher risk of breast cancer mortality HR, 1.

Besides, another study including American breast cancer patients also stated that overweight or obesity was positively associated with recurrence in premenopausal rather than postmenopausal women.

Although the effects of BMI on breast cancer prognosis are still controversial, the possible mechanisms have been disclosed as follow. Some authors reported that in postmenopausal patients with higher BMI, increased synthesis of peripheral estrogen in adipose tissue and reduced sex hormone binding globulin might be responsible for the poor breast cancer prognosis due to enhanced aromatase activity may induce and stimulate the growth of abnormal mammary cells, [ 31 , 32 ] and higher BMI women may not fully benefit from aromatase inhibitors in postmenopausal women.

Our study found that obesity at diagnosis was related to poor prognosis of breast cancer irrespective of menopausal status, while overweight was only associated with prognosis of postmenopausal patients. However, our study has some limitations. Firstly, there is an active debate regarding the limitations of BMI to define obesity and overweight categories for various populations. Thirdly, obese patients are thought to have a higher risk of comorbid conditions, but our study did not include information on comorbidities.

Finally, the sample size was small relatively, follow-up period was short, and we did not adjust other potential confounders. The limitations mentioned above may partly bring about the discrepancy in our study. In conclusion, our study adds to the literature by showing a link of obesity, menopausal status, and breast cancer prognosis. LT will handle the production process.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Published online Jun Find articles by Liming Tang. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Received Mar 11; Accepted May Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated in our hospital from January to December Conclusion: Overweight and obesity might be independently associated with poorer prognosis for breast cancer patients, and the effects of overweight on the breast cancer prognosis seem to be related to menopausal status.

Keywords: body mass index, breast cancer, menopausal, mortality, obesity, overweight, relapse. Introduction Nowadays, obesity or overweight has become an emerging health concern worldwide with over million adults were obese and million were overweight in , [ 1 , 2 ] and overweight or obesity was also reported to be a risk factor for increased incidence of various forms of cancer. Methods 2. Patient selection Data in the study were extracted from the hospital recording statistics in the Affiliated Changzhou No.

Group definitions We calculated BMI as weight in kilograms divided by height in square meters. Statistical analysis In our study, the associations between different BMI groups and clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer patients were analyzed by the chi-square test. Clinical characteristics of patients in study groups The median follow-up time for this study was 80 months 13— months.

Open in a separate window. Table 2 Univariate analysis of 5-year survival for all patients. Figure 1. Table 3 Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model for survival in all patients.

BMI and prognosis of breast cancer for premenopausal patients In univariate analysis, both the 5-year DFS and OS were significantly different among the 3 groups for premenopausal patients.

Figure 2. Table 5 Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model for survival in premenopausal patients. BMI and prognosis of breast cancer for postmenopausal patients When compared to the normal weight group, the 5-year DFS and OS of overweight and obesity groups for postmenopausal patients were significantly decreased.

Bmi and breast cancer

Bmi and breast cancer